A paper is the tip of an iceberg

I was reading Clark and Manning (2016) and studying their code. The contrast is just amazing.

This is what the paper has to say:

architecture

This is what I found after 1 hour of reading a JSON file and writing down all layers of the neural net (the file is data/models/all_pairs/architecture.json, created when you run the experiment):

deep-coref.png
Without the source code, this would be a replication nightmare for sure.

References

Clark, K., & Manning, C. D. (2016). Improving Coreference Resolution by Learning Entity-Level Distributed Representations. Proceedings of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, 643–653. http://doi.org/10.18653/v1/P16-1061

Reproducing Chen & Manning (2014)

Neural dependency parsing is attractive for several reasons: first, distributed representation generalizes better, second, fast parsing unlocks new applications, and third, fast training means parsers can be co-trained with other NLP modules and integrated into a bigger system.

Chen & Manning (2014) from Stanford were the first to show that neural dependency parsing works and Google folks were quick to adopt this paradigm to improve the state-of-the-art (e.g. Weiss et al., 2015).

Though Stanford open-sourced their parser as part of CoreNLP, they didn’t release the code of their experiments. As anybody in academia probably knows, reproducing experiments is non-trivial, even extremely difficult at times. Since I have painstakingly gone through the process, I think it’s a good idea to share with you.

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